Suzi Light

be nice to each other

#art

bnprime:

ironpatriotisstupid:

greytaliesin:

I built this my freshman year of art school; our assignment was to replicate a device out of cardboard that was at least 5 feet in height or breadth and had a working mechanism of some kind using only cardboard, shipping tape, hot glue, and rope

naturally I built a working guillotine

I got an A son

i want to be like you when i grow up

you better the fuck have named it “box cutter”

kenobi-wan-obi:

don’t be afraid of art. don’t deny it’s power either. it will change you for better or worst. trust yourself to find a way to make it work and build on that. keep doing it just to do it, have fun, don’t do it to get better, don’t do it to get to point B when you’re in point A. cause you’ll miss the point of art entirely. art isn’t about getting from where you are to where you were or will be it’s more about doing the thing now, focusing on now, what you can do now not what you can’t do or what you could do or will do. you’ll lose yourself and that’s usually when people give up.

unless you were born with more mental challenges than those of able-bodied people (meaning you just gotto find a work-around to the conventional methods that work for the able bodied), our brains get better at the thing we repeatedly do, the more you put pressure down on the pencil and move your hand all around the paper (or whatever medium you’re using, the point is motor repetition) the more comfortable your mind and body becomes to the act. that’s why “practice makes perfect”, a more precise version of that would be “motor repetition makes perfect”.

you lose the battle of becoming a better artist than you were yesterday when you give into the idea that you’ll never progress because you’re still not in point B or C. instead of picking up the pencil and getting your body used to this new way of expressing itself and using itself to change itself you slowly stop, or do it less and less until your body prioritizes itself on doing something else, like worrying or being anxious. drawing changes the way you think and view the world in such a profound way that it’s so worth the somewhat repetitive movements when you see the final product both in your creation and how you’ve molded yourself.

art is really about doing the thing over and over again until you can finally express your mind in a way you’re comfortable with. just keep doing it and you’ll be aight.

archivesofamericanart:

Meet Toshiko Takaezu: a potter who (like all potters) was not afraid to play with fire. In our oral history interview with her, she reflects on why she became a potter:

…the impact that I got from women potters, the strength that you could feel, the strength that is in the pot, made me feel that I really like this…and to have such an impression that I got from the pottery that the women made and the force that they had with the piece, and they didn’t make to have it in the galleries and the museum, they make because they can use it.

- Oral history interview with Toshiko Takaezu, 2003 June 16
Original, un-gif-ed image:
Toshiko Takaezu throwing a ceramic pot, 1974 / Evon Streetman, photographer. Toshiko Takaezu papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

archivesofamericanart:

Meet Toshiko Takaezu: a potter who (like all potters) was not afraid to play with fire. In our oral history interview with her, she reflects on why she became a potter:

…the impact that I got from women potters, the strength that you could feel, the strength that is in the pot, made me feel that I really like this…and to have such an impression that I got from the pottery that the women made and the force that they had with the piece, and they didn’t make to have it in the galleries and the museum, they make because they can use it.

- Oral history interview with Toshiko Takaezu, 2003 June 16

Original, un-gif-ed image:

Toshiko Takaezu throwing a ceramic pot, 1974 / Evon Streetman, photographer. Toshiko Takaezu papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

enjoyprogress:

sothankyoumusic:

opticallyaroused:

This dude has a sick skill!!

_______

This rock balancing is done by Michael Grab. He is an artist and has killer patience. On his site gravityglue.com, Grab explains:

“The most fundamental element of balancing in a physical sense is finding some kind of ‘tripod’ for the rock to stand on. Every rock is covered in a variety of tiny to large indentations that can act as a tripod for the rock to stand upright, or in most orientations you can think of with other rocks. By paying close attention to the feeling of the rocks, you will start to feel even the smallest clicks as the notches of the rocks in contact are moving over one another. Parallel to the physical element of finding tripods, the most fundamental non-physical element is harder to explain through words. In a nutshell, I am referring to meditation, or finding a zero point or silence within yourself. Some balances can apply significant pressure on your mind and your patience. The challenge is overcoming any doubt that may arise.” Pretty sick, amiright?

Daaaaamn

I LOVE THIS.