Suzi Light

be nice to each other

#art

pearl-nautilus:

The Koru - Maori Symbol of CreationThe koru (Māori for “loop”) is a spiral shape based on the shape of a new unfurling silver fern frond and symbolizing new life, growth, strength and peace. It is an integral symbol in Māori art, carving and tattoos. The circular shape of the koru helps to convey the idea of perpetual movement while the inner coil suggests a return to the point of origin.Koru is the integral central motif of symbolic, seemingly-abstract kowhaiwhai designs, traditionally used to decorate Maori wharenui (meeting houses). There are numerous semi-formal designs, representing different features of the natural world.Koru can also refer to bone carvings. Those generally take the shape of the uncurling fern plant. When bone is worn on the skin, it changes colour as oil is absorbed. The Māori took this to symbolise that the spirit of the person was inhabiting the pendant. When someone gives a pendant to someone else, it is the custom that they wear it for a time so that part of their spirit is given as well.
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pearl-nautilus:

The Koru - Maori Symbol of Creation

The koru (Māori for “loop”) is a spiral shape based on the shape of a new unfurling silver fern frond and symbolizing new life, growth, strength and peace. It is an integral symbol in Māori art, carving and tattoos. The circular shape of the koru helps to convey the idea of perpetual movement while the inner coil suggests a return to the point of origin.

Koru is the integral central motif of symbolic, seemingly-abstract kowhaiwhai designs, traditionally used to decorate Maori wharenui (meeting houses). There are numerous semi-formal designs, representing different features of the natural world.

Koru can also refer to bone carvings. Those generally take the shape of the uncurling fern plant. When bone is worn on the skin, it changes colour as oil is absorbed. The Māori took this to symbolise that the spirit of the person was inhabiting the pendant. When someone gives a pendant to someone else, it is the custom that they wear it for a time so that part of their spirit is given as well.

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wellwornwornwell:

"The energy accumulated over time and via sentiment leaves its trace on these objects. It speaks at once of ardent use and loss, of an absent presence and an even more present absence. This is the magic of the artist’s trace, the palette and canvases on which real presence can manifest itself in a timeless shroud, the magic one can read in the palimpsest of imprints that is Balthus’s smock."
-Guido Brivio, purple DOCUMENTS, 2014

wellwornwornwell:

"The energy accumulated over time and via sentiment leaves its trace on these objects. It speaks at once of ardent use and loss, of an absent presence and an even more present absence. This is the magic of the artist’s trace, the palette and canvases on which real presence can manifest itself in a timeless shroud, the magic one can read in the palimpsest of imprints that is Balthus’s smock."

-Guido Brivio, purple DOCUMENTS, 2014

fleshcircus:

archiemcphee:

Self-taught Alaskan sculptor Lee Cross, known professionally as Wood Splitter Lee, creates incredible one of a kind fantasy creatures that are so remarkably lifelike they verge on creepy, which is just one of the things that makes them so awesome. All of Lee’s creatures are completely made by hand without the use of and patterns, molds or casts. Their bodies contain articulated skeletons wrapped with stuffing, making them very soft to handle and fully posable. They’re decorated with carefully hand-applied synthetic fur and paint. As you can see from these photos, some of Lee’s creatures are more fantastic in nature than others, but they’re all amazing to behold.

Lee’s creatures are available for purchase through weekly Auction Adoptions held on eBay.

To check out more of her phenomenal handmade creatures, visit Wood Splitter Lee’s DeviantArt gallery.

[via DeMilked]

all of her stuff is awesome